Invited Speakers

18 highly renowned professors and researchers (including Nobel Laureates) from the most prestigious worldwide institutions and, as well, presidents of the most reputed international Photonic Scientific societies and some politicians in this event. At this time we can confirm the participation of Prof. Nakamura (Nobel Laureate): Prof. Mazur (Harvard University, USA) and 2017 OSA President: Eli Yablonovitch (UC, Berkeley, USA) and Sir David Payne (Optoelectronic Research Centre, UK), among others.

 

 

Invited Speaker

Talk & Abstract

Biography

Prof. Shuji Nakamura

2014 Nobel Laureate

Prince Asturias Award

University of California Santa Barbara, USA

The born of High Efficient Blue LEDs and Future Lighting

Invited Keynote

In 1970's and 80’s, an efficient blue and green light-emitting diodes (LED) were the last missing elements for solid-state display and lighting technologies due to the lack of suitable materials. By that time, III-nitride alloys was regarded the least possible candidate due to various "impossible" difficulties. However, a series of unexpected breakthroughs in 1990's totally changed people's view angle. Finally, the first high efficient blue LEDs were invented and commercialized at the same time of 1993. Nowadays, III-nitride-based LEDs have become the most widely used light source in many applications. The LED light bulbs are more than ten times efficient than incandescent bulb, and they last for 50 years! At their current adoption rates, by 2020, LEDs can reduce the world’s need for electricity by the equivalent of nearly 60 nuclear power plants.

Prof. Nakamura is from Ehime, Japan. He obtained his B.E., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from the Univ. of Tokushima, Japan. He joined Nichia Chemical Industries Ltd. in 1979. He spent a year at the Univ. of Florida as a visiting research associate in 1988, and started the research of blue LEDs using group-III nitride materials the following year. In 1993 and 1995, he developed the first group-III nitride-based blue/green LEDs. He also developed the first group-III nitride-based violet laser diodes (LDs) in 1995. He has received a number of awards, including the MRS Medal Award (1997), the IEEE Jack A. Morton Award, the British Rank Prize (1998) and the Benjamin Franklin Medal Award (2002). He was elected as a member of the US National Academy of Engineering (NAE) in 2003, received the Finnish Millennium Technology Prize in 2006, the Prince of Asturias Award from Spain in 2008, the Harvey Prize of Israel Inst. of Technology in 2010, and the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2014. Since 2000, he is a professor in the Materials Department of the Univ. of California Santa Barbara. He holds more than 200 patents and has published more than 400 papers in this field.

Prof. Roel Baets

Director

Center for Nano- and Biophotonics Ghent University IMEC Department of Information Technology


The future of compact and low cost spectroscopy: Advanced spectrometers on Silicon Photonics

Over the past years silicon photonics has become a game-changing technology for high speed transceiver products in telecommunication and datacommunication. But the application of the technology in sensing and life science may have an even larger impact in the future. In this talk the potential as well as the challenges of silicon photonics in life science applications will be addressed and illustrated with various examples. Focus will be particularly on spectroscopic sensing, either through on-chip absorption spectroscopy in the mid IR or through Raman spectroscopy in the visible or near IR. The development of new flavours of silicon photonics geared towards the new wavelength ranges in these applications will also be addressed, including the activities in the European pilot line projects PIX4life and MIRPHAB.

Prof. Baets is full professor at Ghent University (UGent). He is also associated with IMEC. He has management responsibilities within the Photonics Research Group of UGent, the Center for Nano- and Biophotonics (NB Photonics) of UGent, the international Erasmus Mundus MSc program in Photonics and the joint UGent-IMEC research program on silicon photonics. Roel Baets received an MSc degree in Electrical Engineering from Ghent University in 1980 and a second MSc degree from Stanford University in 1981. He received a PhD degree from Ghent University in 1984. From 1984 till 1989 he held a postdoctoral position at IMEC (with detachment to Ghent University). Since 1989 he has been a professor in the Engineering Faculty of UGent where he founded the Photonics Research Group. From 1990 till 1994 he has also been a part-time professor at the Technical University of Delft and from 2004 till 2008 at the Technical University of Eindhoven. Roel Baets has mainly worked in the field of integrated photonic components. He has made contributions to research on semiconductor laser diodes, guided wave and grating devices and to the design and fabrication of photonic ICs, both in III-V semiconductors and in silicon. As part of a team of 7 professors he leads the Photonics Research Group at UGent. With about 80 researchers this group is involved in numerous national and international research programs. The silicon photonics activities of the group are part of a joint research initiative with IMEC. Roel Baets is also director of the multidisciplinary Center for Nano- and Biophotonics (NB Photonics) at UGent, founded in 2010. Roel Baets was co-founder of the interuniversity UGent-VUB MSc programme in Photonics and of the international Erasmus Mundus MSc programme in Photonics, of which he chairs the Board. Roel Baets is a grant holder of the Methusalem programme of the Flemish government and of the European Research Council (ERC advanced grant). He is a Fellow of the IEEE of the EOS and of the OSA.

 

Prof. José-Miguel López-Higuera

ISLiST Director

Director

Photonics Engineering Group, University of Cantabria, Spain

Light in Energy and Environment

Light Science and Technologies (Photonics) now touches almost every area of our lives, and its contributions to both power generation and energy conservation can be expected to grow considerably through the 21st century. Photonics is essential in the conversion of sunlight to electrical, thermal, and chemical energy. It also makes an important and significant contribution to reducing energy consumption through more efficient lighting, displays, communications and as well with impact on the environment as a key monitoring tool. In this talk, after a brief mention of what should be understood as the Photonics Field and the key light properties concerning the power generation and energy and environment conservation, we will go into the potential uses of light based technologies in Energy and Environment. Several significant cases will be presented and discussed in the presentation. After that, the attendees will be aware of the significant impact of Light Sciences and Technologies on power generation and energy and as well environment conservation along this first quarter of the 21st century.
Prof. López-Higuera is a Professor in Electronics and Photonics, the founder and head of the Photonics Engineering Group, University of Cantabria, Spain. He is a Member of a wide set of international Committees of Conferences, R&D Institutions, and Companies in the area of photonic sensing. His work is focused on optical sensor systems and instrumentations for any sector application. He has worked in a wide range of R&D&i projects, acting in more than 80 of them as manager. He has contributed with more than 600 research publications including 17 patents closely related to optical and fiber techniques for sensors and instrumentations. He has worked as an editor and co-author of four R&D international books, as a co-editor of several conference proceedings and Journals and he has been the director of 16 PhD theses. He is co-founder of three technology-based companies. Prof. López-Higuera is a Fellow of OSA, Fellow of SPIE, Senior of IEEE and is a Member of the Royal Academy of Medicine of Cantabria.

 

Prof. Antonio Luque

Director

Institute of Solar Energy, Universidad Politécnica de Madrd, Spain

Photovoltaics for highly efficient energy conversion and storage

Traditional silicon solar cells, of efficiencies below 20%, are today produced so cheap that can even compete, in appropriate locations, with coal power plants. It can be ensured that photovoltaics will play a central role in the enormous increase of power capacity required by the increasing welfare extending worldwide. But solar electricity is, by nature, intermittent. The next challenge is storage. The latent heat of fusion of silicon is very high, of 0.5 kWh/kg. Furthermore not-purified silicon is one of the cheapest materials, about $2/kg. In this way one of the cheapest methods of energy storage is melting silicon. The high melting point of silicon, 1410° C, has discouraged engineers for using it but for the photovoltaic technology this is an advantage. The heat of the molten silicon can be recovered with photovoltaic cells operating in the thermophotovoltaic (TPV) mode. High efficiency solar cells must be used for it. Multijunction cells have converted the sunlight (at 5504° C) with efficiency of 46%. InGaAsSb/GaSb cells may be used for manufacturing TPV devices with a practical efficiency of 41%. In this way the molten silicon storage may be as cheap as the re-pumping hydropower, today the cheapest in extended use. Novel concepts in solar cells could even exceed the efficiency mentioned.
Prof. Luque (b. 1941) is Dr. Engineer in Telecommunication. Emeritus Chair Professor of Electronic Technology at the Polytechnic University of Madrid, since 1970, in which he honoraryly presides the Institute of Solar Energy, he founded in 1979. His research activity is mainly devoted to the photovoltaic conversion of solar energy. He invented the bifacial cell in 1976. This cell was fabricated by Isofotón, a company he created in 1982, and has been present in more than 50 countries. More recently (1997) Prof. Luque has proposed the new intermediate band solar cell —a concept that might overcome the fundamental efficiency limitations of conventional solar cells— and has been working in developing this concept. He has also been involved in Concentrator Photovoltaic Research and he inspired the creation of the Institute for Concentrator Photovoltaic Systems in Castilla La Mancha, whose Scientific Advisory Board he chairs and in Silicon ultrapurification research as former CEO of the university-industry joint company CENTESIL for a pilot plant in this sector. He has published many papers, one with more than 1000 citations (WOK h-index 37) as well as some books and holds over 20 patents. He has obtained, among others (twice), the Spanish National Prize for Technology (1989 and 2003), granted by the King of Spain, the Alexander-Edmond Becquerel Prize in PV research, granted by the EC (1992) and the William Cherry Award to PV research granted by the IEEE (2006) and the Karl Böer Solar Energy Medal of Merit (2015), granted by the University of Delaware. He is Member of the Royal Academy of Engineering of Spain (since 1995) and to the Russian Academy of Sciences (since 2005), Doctor Honoris Causa by tree Spanish Universities (Carlos III and Jaen, both 2005 and Málaga 2016) and Member of Honour of the Ioffe Institute of St Petersburg (since 2002).

 

Prof. G. Konstantatos

Head

Functional Optoelectronic Nanomaterials Group, ICFO, Barcelona, Spain

Nanophotonics and colloidal quantum dots for more efficient solar cells

Solution Processed Quantum Dot solar cells offer a unique platform for third generation low cost solar cells in view of their facile solution processability, bandgap tenability and exquisite control of their optoelectronic properties by engineering at the atomic and supra-nanocrystalline level. At the same time they offer additional photonic engineering opportunities and challenges given the form factor and optical properties of colloidal quantum dots. In this talk I will summarize the progress made in the recent years in the field of colloidal quantum dot solar cells by several groups around the world and also highlight some examples on the role that nanophotonics can play in further boosting their performance.

Prof. Konstantatos is currently an ICREA professor at the Institute of Photonic Sciences in Barcelona, Spain leading the group of functional optoelectronic nanomaterials. He got his Ph.D. in electrical and computer engineering from the University of Toronto, ON, Canada in 2008. He has been the recipient of the MIT TR35 Spain award in 2012 and the Fresnel Prize 2013 for his salient contributions in the field of colloidal quantum dot optoelectronics. In 2016 he was awarded an ERC Consolidator Grant to develop new environmentally friendly semiconductors for thin film solar cells. He has authored more than 50 journal publications (12 of which in Nature family journals) and his work has been cited more than 7500 times (Google scholar).

Prof. Prof. Eli Yablonovitch

Director

NSF Center for Energy Efficient Electronics Science

University of California, Berkeley, USA



A great solar cell also needs to be a great LED: Yablonovitch Limit

We now know that the photovoltaic cell and the LED are really the reciprocal of one another. The slogan: "A Great Solar Cell Also Needs To Be A Great LED" has produced to all the new solar cell efficiency records. Very efficient light emitting diodes (LED's), surprisingly, do actually become cold as they operate, since LED light carries away entropy. This cooling requires superb LED efficiency, which is enabled by 2d photonic crystal patterning, for luminescence extraction. What if the electrical output of a photovoltaic cell drives an LED, and the LED light in turn drives the photovoltaic cell? You might fear that it would become a perpetual motion machine. Instead it becomes a heat engine in which a small amount electricity can efficiently provide refrigeration, or conversely a small temperature difference can generate electricity. Such an electro-luminescent heat engine, in which photons are the working fluid, can be more efficient than the competing science, thermo-electrics, in which electrons are the working fluid.
Prof. Yablonovitch introduced the idea that strained semiconductor lasers could have superior performance due to reduced valence band (hole) effective mass. With almost every human interaction with the internet, optical telecommunication occurs by strained semiconductor lasers. He is regarded as a Father of the Photonic BandGap concept, and he coined the term "Photonic Crystal". The geometrical structure of the first experimentally realized Photonic bandgap, is sometimes called “Yablonovite”. In his photovoltaic research, Yablonovitch introduced the 4(n squared) (“Yablonovitch Limit”) light-trapping factor that is in worldwide use, for almost all commercial solar panels. His mantra that "a great solar cell also needs to be a great LED”, is the basis of the world record solar cells: single-junction 28.8% efficiency; dual-junction 31.5%; quadruple-junction 38.8% efficiency; all at 1 sun. Prof. Yablonovitch is elected as a Member of the National Academy of Engineering, the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, and is a Foreign Member of the Royal Society of London. He has been awarded the Buckley Prize of the American Physical Society, the Isaac Newton Medal of the UK Institute of Physics, the Rank Prize (UK), the Harvey Prize (Israel), the IEEE Photonics Award, the IET Mountbatten Medal (UK), the Julius Springer Prize (Germany), the R.W. Wood Prize, the W. Streifer Scientific Achievement Award, and the Adolf Lomb Medal. He also has an honorary Ph.D. from the Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, & the Hong Kong Univ. of Science & Technology, and is honorary Professor at Nanjing University. Eli Yablonovitch is the Director of the NSF Center for Energy Efficient Electronics Science (E3S), a multi-University Center headquartered at Berkeley. He received his Ph.D. degree in Applied Physics from Harvard University in 1972. He worked for two years at Bell Telephone Laboratories, and then became a professor of Applied Physics at Harvard. In 1979 he joined Exxon to do research on photovoltaic solar energy. Then in 1984, he joined Bell Communications Research, where he was a Distinguished Member of Staff, and also Director of Solid-State Physics Research. In 1992 he joined the University of California, Los Angeles, where he was the Northrop-Grumman Chair Professor of Electrical Engineering. Then in 2007 he became Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences at UC Berkeley, where he holds the James & Katherine Lau Chair in Engineering. .

Prof. Christian Sattler

Director

Department of Solar Chemical Engineering


Aerospace Center´s Institute of Solar Research, Germany


Solar Fuels and Electricity by using Sunlight concentrating Systems

The production of electricity and fuels by concentrated solar radiation is an option for efficient large scale processes. The radiation can either be used to replace fossil fuels for heating established processes like steam or dry reforming of methane. Or at higher temperature to drive thermochemical cycles for water or CO2 splitting into hydrogen, oxygen and CO. Presently most of the technologies are developed with high flux solar simulators. However some scale-up demonstrations on solar towers have been operated. The concentrator systems, mainly heliostat fields, are similar to installations for power production. However the chemical reactions require a different heating regime. Therefore a special optics and control systems have to be developed to achieve the very high temperatures necessary to carry out thermochemical cycles constantly and homogeneously in the whole solar receiver. The presentation will give an overview of the concentrating solar fuel production processes. It will give insight in how to design the required heliostat fields, secondary optics, and control systems.

Prof.Sattler is head of the Department of Solar Chemical Engineering of the German Aerospace Center’s Institute of Solar Research. He is also professor for solar fuel production at the Technical University of Dresden. The main area of his work is the production of fuels especially hydrogen by solar thermo- and photochemical processes. He serves as vice president of the research association N.ERGHY a member of the European Joint Technology Initiative for Fuel Cells and Hydrogen and is the national representative to tasks of the IEA’s SolarPACES and Hydrogen Implementing Agreements.

Prof. Christian Pedersen

Head

Optical Sensor Technology Group


Technical University of Denmark


Diode Laser LIDARs for renewable energy generation

A main consideration in the development of wind turbines for renewable energy is metrology issues. Efficient and accurate wind velocity sensing, including turbulence mapping and wake detection systems are central for the optimisation of a wind turbine and its lifetime. Traditional cup and sonic anemometers require either meteorological masts or installation in the wake produced by the rotor blades obstructing the measurement quality. In contrast, LIDAR technology offers a unique possibility for remote wind sensing; however traditional LIDARs are not well suited for individual wind turbine installation due to production cost. Replacing costly fibre laser assemblies with diode laser technology offers a solution to this LIDAR challenge. Both technical and entrepreneurial aspects of diode laser-based wind LIDARs for turbine control will be presented.

Prof.Pedersen is Head of Programme, Group Leader (Optical Sensor Technology) of DTU Fotonik, Department of Photonics Engineering. Christian Pedersen heads a group of 14 researchers and technicians focusing on optical sensor technology. The primary focus is mid-IR upconversion imaging and detection, semiconductor LIDARs for remote sensing and industrial sensors. Christian has previously worked in two start-up companies. In 2008 he joined DTU Fotonik in Denmark. .

Prof. Adolfo Comerón

Head

Optical Remote Sensing Group

Universidad Politécnica de Cataluña, Spain



LIDAR Systems for Air atmospheric probing: principles and trends in aerosol vertical profiling

Laser radar or lidar (acronym of light detection and ranging) extends the classical radiofrequency radar techniques to the infrared, visible and ultraviolet spectral ranges and makes use of the relatively strong interaction between electromagnetic radiation at these short wavelengths and atmospheric constituents (molecules and particulates) to obtain range-resolved information about the state of the atmosphere. The talk will present the principles underlying different types of lidar for atmospheric probing, and the optoelectronic setups of lidar instruments, to focus on advanced systems for aerosol vertical profiling, which are being networked at continental scales to determine the properties and transport patterns of suspended particles in the atmosphere (aerosols) and their effects on air quality, weather and climate.
Prof. Comerón holds a Telecommunication Engineering degree from Universidad Politécnica de Barcelona (now Universidad Politécnica de Cataluña – UPC-BarcelonaTech) and doctorates from University Paris-XI, Orsay, France and Universidad Politécnica de Barcelona. He is a professor with the Department of Signal Theory and Communications of UPC, involved in teaching electromagnetics-related topics. His current focus of research is on free-space optical communications and lidar systems for atmospheric probing. He has co-authored more than 60 papers in peer-reviewed scientific journals. He is a SPIE and IEEE member and was elected member of the International Coordination-group on Laser Atmospheric Studies (ICLAS) for the 2004-2010 term. He co-chairs the Remote Sensing of Clouds and the Atmosphere conference within SPIE Remote Sensing..

Prof. Jérome Faist

Director

Quantum Optoelectronic Group Institute for Quantum Electronics


ETH Zurich, Switzerland

Laser Frequency Comb and their application on spectroscopic sensing of environmental Polutants

To be published

Prof. Faits was born in Geneva, and obtained his Bachelor and Ph.D. in Physics, in the group of Prof. F.-K Reinhart from the Swiss Institute of Technology in Lausanne in 1985, 1989 respectively. After a post-doc in IBM Rueschlikon (89-91), he joined F. Capasso's group in Bell Laboratories in 1991 where he worked first as a post-doc and then as a Member of Technical Staff. From 1997 to 2007, he was professor in the physics institute of the University of Neuchâtel. In 2007, he became professor in the institute for quantum electronics of the ETH Zurich. .

Round Table I: Challenges on Light in Energy and Environment

Prof. Antonio Luque,Director Institute of Solar Energy of Polytechnic University of Madrid, Spain.

Challenges highly efficient energy conversion and storage

Prof. Christian Sattler,President Department of Solar Chemical Engineering, Aerospace Center´s Institute of Solar Research, Germany

Challenges in harnessing the light with solar concentrator systems.

Prof. Eli Yablonovitch ,Director NSF Center for Energy Efficient Electronics Science University of California, Berkeley, USA Munich, Germany

Challenges on PV cells.

Prof. JM López-Higuera, Director ISLiST, Moderator

 

Prof. Eric Mazur

OSA 2017 President

Director/Dean

Applied Physics at Harvard University, USA

Less is More: Extreme Optics with Zero Refractive Index

Nanotechnology has enabled the development of nanostructured composite materials (metamaterials) with exotic optical properties not found in nature. In the most extreme case, we can create materials which support light waves that propagate with infinite phase velocity, corresponding to a refractive index of zero. This zero index can only be achieved by simultaneously controlling the electric and magnetic resonances of the nanostructure. We present an in-plane metamaterial design consisting of silicon pillar arrays, embedded within a polymer matrix and sandwiched between gold layers. Using an integrated nano-scale prism constructed of the proposed material, we demonstrate unambiguously a refractive index of zero in the optical regime. This design serves as a novel on-chip platform to explore the exotic physics of zero-index metamaterials, with applications to super-coupling, integrated quantum optics, and phase matching.Read more about Prof. Mazur's talk at Harvard website

Prof. Mazur is the Balkanski Professor of Physics and Applied Physics and Dean of Applied Physics at Harvard University, Member of the Faculty of Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, and President 2017 of the Optical Society. Mazur is a prominent physicist known for his contributions in nanophotonics, an internationally recognized educational innovator, and a sought after speaker. In education he is widely known for his work on Peer Instruction, an interactive teaching method aimed at engaging students in the classroom and beyond. In 2014 Mazur became the inaugural recipient of the Minerva Prize for Advancements in Higher Education. He has received many awards for his work in physics and in education and has founded several successful companies. Mazur is Chief Academic Advisor for Turning Technologies, a company developing interactive response systems for the education market. Mazur has widely published in peer-reviewed journals and holds numerous patents. He has also written extensively on education and is the author of Peer Instruction: A User's Manual (Prentice Hall, 1997), a book that explains how to teach large lecture classes interactively, and of the Principles and Practice of Physics (Pearson, 2015), a book that presents a groundbreaking new approach to teaching introductory calculus-based physics.Mazur is a leading speaker on optics and on education. His motivational lectures on interactive teaching, educational technology, and assessment have inspired people around the world to change their approach to teaching. Read More

Prof. Javier Solis

Head

Head of the Department of Non-linear, Ultrafast and Nano-scale Photonics Instituto de Optica-CSIC Madrid

Femtosecond-laser induced compositional changes for photonics applications

In 1996, two seminal papers from the groups of K. Hirao and E. Mazur independently demonstrated the feasibility of using femtosecond (fs) lasers for modifying the optical properties of a small volume inside the bulk of a transparent material. The magnitude of the refractive index change achievable is typically though below 10-2 (associated to density or polarizability changes, defects, photochemical effects, damage…). In spite of this, fs-laser structuring has been used for producing a wide variety of photonic (and also micro-fluidic) devices ranging from simple passive waveguides to waveguide-integrated lasers or photonic lanterns. During the first part of the talk I will describe the fundamentals of this direct writing technique, its main advantages and limitations, as well as a number of relevant application examples. In the second part I will describe the use of controlled, local compositional changes produced by fs-laser processing to generate high contrast, refractive structures for photonics applications.

 

 

Prof. Solis is Research Professor at the Institute of Optics (IO) of the National Research Council of Spain (CSIC) where he is presently Head of the Department of Non-linear, Ultrafast and Nano-scale Photonics. He has also been Director ((2003-2008) and Deputy Director (2000-2003) of the IO. Since 1992 he is responsible of the Ultrashort Laser Pulse Laboratory of the Laser Processing Group. At present his research interests include: laser-matter interaction, laser processing for optical applications, ultrafast laser micro-and nano-structuring of materials, ultrafast dynamics, non-linear optics. He has published more than 160 research papers in international research journals in these topics. Prof. Solis is member of OSA and MRS, among other research societies.

Prof. Sir David Payne

Director

Optoelectronic Research Centre (ORC), University of Southampton, UK

To be published

Prof. Sir David Payne CBE FRS FREng is a leading Professor at the University of Southampton and Director of the Optoelectronics Research Centre. A world class pioneer of technology, his work has had a great impact on telecommunications and laser technology over the last forty years. The vast transmission capacity of today’s internet results directly from the erbium-doped fibre amplifier (EDFA) invented by David and his team in the 1980s. His pioneering work in fibre fabrication in the 70s resulted in almost all of the special fibres in use today including fibre lasers which are currently undergoing rapid growth for application in manufacturing and defence. David has made numerous leading contributions to many diverse fields of photonics and is widely acknowledged as an inventor of key components. Currently, his main research interest is high-power fibre lasers. With US funding, he led the team that broke the kilowatt barrier for fibre laser output to international acclaim and now holds many other fibre laser performance records. An original member of the Highly Cited Researchers (USA) he is honoured as one of the most referenced, influential researchers in the world. He has published over 650 Conference and Journal papers and is a frequent plenary and invited speaker at major international optics conferences. As an entrepreneur David’s activities have led to a cluster of 11 photonics spin out companies in and around Southampton - helping to boost the local economy. He founded SPI Lasers PLC, which has recently been purchased by the Trumpf Corporation of Germany for $40M. Recently elected Chairman of the Marconi Society and to the Russian Academy of Sciences, David is a fellow of the Royal Society and the Royal Academy of Engineering. He became a Commander of the British Empire in the 2007 New Years Honours list. In addition he has been awarded the top American, European and Japanese prizes in photonics. Recent awards include the Marconi Prize in 2008 and the 2007 IEE Photonics Award the first to be awarded to a person outside the USA. Most recently, in 2010, David received the AILU (Association of Laser Users) Award for his pioneering work with fibre lasers.

He is Associate Editor of Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics edited by the Royal Society of Chemistry.

Prof. Pablo Artal

Director

Optical Laboratory Optical and Nanophysics Research Centre Universidad de Murcia Spain

Light science and technology for a better vision

The human eye is a simple optical system but well adapted to the requirements of our visual system. A better optical knowledge has allowed to develop new technological solutions to improve vision. In this lecture, I will review the main optical properties of the eye and how they affect our visual capabilities, together with the use of adaptive optics technologies that permitted to see the retina with high resolution and also to develop new instruments for visual testing. I will also present several recent results obtained in my laboratory, ranging from the nature of the movements of the crystalline lens to new electro-optical systems to correct cataracts or presbyopia."

Prof. Artal is received his Ph.D. degree in Physics from the University Complutense of Madrid, and was a post-doctoral fellow at the Institut d'Optique, Orsay, France and a senior researcher at the Instituto de Optica in Madrid. He is since 1994 full Professor of Optics at the University of Murcia, Spain. He spent several periods doing collaborative research in laboratories in Europe, Australia and USA He is a fellow member of the OSA, ARVO (gold category) and EOS. He received the prestigious 2013 Edwin H Land medal award in recognition of his scientific contributions to the advancement of diagnostic and correction alternatives in visual optics. He is the recipient of the exclusive “ERC advanced grant” in 2013. He received the “Rey Jaime I” award for applied research in 2015. He has published more than 170 reviewed papers that received 7700 citations (h-index: 45), presented more than 150 invited talks in international meetings and around 150 seminars in different research institutions. He is also a co-inventor of 22 international patents in the field of Optics and Ophthalmology . He has pioneered highly innovative advances in the methods for studying the optics of the eye and has contributed substantially to our understanding of the factors that limit human visual resolution. Dr. Artal is a pioneer in exploring the human eye with new technologies and designed new ophthalmic corrections. Several of his proposed solutions and instrument are currently in use in the clinical practice. For example, he co-invented intraocular lenses correcting for the corneal spherical aberration that provides improved quality of vision to millions of patients over the world. Dr. Artal is the founder of Voptica SL a spin-off company developing the concept he invented of adaptive optics vision analyzers and a co-founder of Visiometrics SL. He has been the mentor of many graduate and post-doctoral students. His personal science blog is followed by readers, mostly graduate students and fellow researchers, from around the world. He has been editor of the Journal of the Optical Society of America A and the Journal of Vision. He is the editor of the Handbook of Visual Optics

 

Prof. Eric Mazur

OSA 2017 President

Director/Dean

Applied Physics at Harvard University, USA

Innovating Education to Educate Innovators

Can we teach innovation? Innovation requires whole-brain thinking — right-brain thinking for creativity and imagination, and left-brain thinking for planning and execution. Our current approach to education in science and technology, focuses on the transfer of information, developing mostly right-brain thinking by stressing copying and reproducing existing ideas rather than generating new ones. I will show how shifting the focus in lectures from delivering information to team work and creative thinking greatly improves the learning that takes place in the classroom and promotes independent thinking.Read more about Prof. Mazur's talk at Harvard website

Prof. Mazuris the Balkanski Professor of Physics and Applied Physics and Dean of Applied Physics at Harvard University, Member of the Faculty of Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, and President 2017 of the Optical Society. Mazur is a prominent physicist known for his contributions in nanophotonics, an internationally recognized educational innovator, and a sought after speaker. In education he is widely known for his work on Peer Instruction, an interactive teaching method aimed at engaging students in the classroom and beyond. In 2014 Mazur became the inaugural recipient of the Minerva Prize for Advancements in Higher Education. He has received many awards for his work in physics and in education and has founded several successful companies. Mazur is Chief Academic Advisor for Turning Technologies, a company developing interactive response systems for the education market. Mazur has widely published in peer-reviewed journals and holds numerous patents. He has also written extensively on education and is the author of Peer Instruction: A User's Manual (Prentice Hall, 1997), a book that explains how to teach large lecture classes interactively, and of the Principles and Practice of Physics (Pearson, 2015), a book that presents a groundbreaking new approach to teaching introductory calculus-based physics.Mazur is a leading speaker on optics and on education. His motivational lectures on interactive teaching, educational technology, and assessment have inspired people around the world to change their approach to teaching. Read More

Round Table II: Education and Training on a key technology (Photonics)

Prof. Shuji Nakamura, 2014 Nobel Prize, Prince Asturias Award, Materials Department, University of California Santa Barbara, USA

Prof. Eric Mazur ,2017 OSA President, Director, Applied Physics Deparment, Harvard University, USA

Prof. Sir David Payne ,Director, Optoelectronic Research Centre (ORC), University of Southampton, UK

Prof. JM López-Higuera, Director ISLiST, Moderator